Idaho

Parks

  • National Historic Trail

    California

    Various States, CA,CO,ID,KS,MO,NE,NV,OR,UT,WY

    Follow in the footsteps of over 250,000 emigrants who traveled to the gold fields and rich farmlands of California during the 1840s and 1850s-the greatest mass migration in American history. More than 1,000 miles of trail ruts and traces can still be seen across 10 states on the California National Historic Trail.

  • National Reserve

    City Of Rocks

    Almo, ID

    Emigrants of the California Trail describe the rocks here in vivid detail as "a city of tall spires,” “steeple rocks," and "the silent city." Today, this backcountry byway attracts rock climbers, campers, hikers, hunters, and those with the spirit of adventure. There's inspirational scenery, exceptional opportunities for geologic study, and remnants of the Old West awaiting your discovery.

  • National Monument & Preserve

    Craters Of The Moon

    Arco, Carey and Rupert , ID

    Craters of the Moon is a vast ocean of lava flows with scattered islands of cinder cones and sagebrush. We invite you to explore this "weird and scenic landscape" where yesterday's volcanic events are likely to continue tomorrow...

  • National Monument

    Hagerman Fossil Beds

    Hagerman, ID

    Did you know horses evolved in North America? The Hagerman Horse, Equus simplicidens, was the first true horse. It's the park's most famous fossil but we have over two hundred different species. From saber-toothed cat, mastodon, bear, camel, and ground sloth, to much smaller animals like rodents and frogs, the scientific study of Pliocene fossils is the key to Hagerman.

  • National Geologic Trail

    Ice Age Floods

    WA,OR,ID,MT

    "At the end of the last Ice Age, some 12,000 to 17,000 years ago, a series of cataclysmic floods occurred in what is now the northwest region of the United States, leaving a lasting mark of dramatic and distinguishing features on the landscape of parts of the States of Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon." Public Law 111-11, March 30, 2009

  • National Historic Trail

    Lewis & Clark

    Eleven States: ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA

    Between May 1804 and September 1806, 31 men, one woman, and a baby traveled from the plains of the Midwest to the shores of the Pacific Ocean. They called themselves the Corps of Discovery. In their search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, they opened a window into the west for the young United States.

  • National Historic Site

    Minidoka

    Jerome, ID,WA

    The Pearl Harbor attack intensified existing hostility towards Japanese Americans. As wartime hysteria mounted, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 forcing over 120,000 West Coast persons of Japanese ancestry (Nikkei) to leave their homes, jobs, and lives behind and move to one of ten Relocation Centers. This single largest forced relocation in U.S. history is Minidoka's story.

  • National Historical Park

    Nez Perce

    four states, ID,MT,OR,WA

    For thousands of years the valleys, prairies, mountains, and plateaus of the inland northwest have been home to the Nimiipuu or Nez Perce people. Extremely resilient they have adapted and survived the settling of the United States. Explore these places. Learn their stories.

  • National Historic Trail

    Oregon

    Various States, ID,KS,MO,NE,OR,WA,WY

    Imagine yourself an emigrant headed for Oregon: would promises of lush farmlands and a new beginning lure you to leave home and walk for weeks? More than 2,000 miles of trail ruts and traces can still be seen along the Oregon National Historic Trail in six states-reminders of the sacrifices, struggles, and triumphs of early American settlers.

  • National Park

    Yellowstone

    Yellowstone National Park, ID,MT,WY

    Visit Yellowstone and experience the world's first national park. Marvel at a volcano’s hidden power rising up in colorful hot springs, mudpots, and geysers. Explore mountains, forests, and lakes to watch wildlife and witness the drama of the natural world unfold. Discover the history that led to the conservation of our national treasures “for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.”

By The Numbers

These numbers are just a sample of the National Park Service's work. Figures are for the fiscal year that ended 9/30/2016.